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Orange Pippin Trees USA logoSpecialist fruit trees for your orchard or back-yard

Peach trees

Peaches are not quite as easy to grow as apples or plums, but the flavor of home-grown peaches can make it worthwhile trying.

  • In stock
    Peach trees

    Carolina Belle

    Carolina Belle is a large self-fertile white-fleshed freestone peach.
    $36.95buy
    • Self-fertility: Self-fertile
    • Flesh colour: White
  • In stock
    Peach trees

    Contender

    A reliable late-blooming yellow-fleshed peach with a good flavor.
    $36.95buy
    • Self-fertility: Self-fertile
    • Flesh colour: Golden / Yellow
    • Cling-stone: Freestone
  • In stock
    Peach trees

    Galactica

    Galactica is a self-fertile cold-hardy white-fleshed donut or peento peach.
    $36.95buy
    • Self-fertility: Self-fertile
    • Flesh colour: White
    • Cling-stone: Freestone
  • In stock
    Peach trees

    Intrepid

    A cold-hardy orange-flesh freestone peach which blooms late in the spring.
    $36.95buy
    • Self-fertility: Self-fertile
    • Flesh colour: Golden / Yellow
    • Cling-stone: Freestone
  • In stock
    Peach trees

    PF8 Ball

    PF8 Ball is a sweet self-fertile early-season freestone yellow-flesh peach.
    $36.95buy
    • Self-fertility: Self-fertile
    • Flesh colour: Golden / Yellow
    • Cling-stone: Freestone
  • In stock
    Peach trees

    Redhaven

    Redhaven is the definitive American peach - sweet, juicy, with a yellow flesh which comes away easily from the stone.
    $36.95buy
    • Self-fertility: Self-fertile
    • Flesh colour: Golden / Yellow
    • Cling-stone: Freestone


How to choose Peach trees

Peaches are a luxurious fruit originating in the Far East and now grown throughout warm temperate regions. Peach trees prefer a continental climate, especially warm or hot summers.

Peach-leaf curl is a serious fungal disease of peaches (and nectarines). It is transmitted by fungal spores which are active during late-winter / early-spring and are carried in splashes of rain drops. The infection causes the leaves to curl and shrivel (often taking on a dull red tinge at the same time). Although the tree will often produce a second flush of leaves later in the spring, it will probably not produce any fruit. Fortunately peach leaf curl can be readily avoided by covering wall-trained trees over winter and early spring with a frost fleece or similar.

Peach trees grown in patio containers can also be protected simply by keeping them indoors over the winter. If you are growing your peach trees in a greenhouse or polytunnel then you will be able to avoid it altogether.

Whilst it is generally advisable to keep pruning of all stone fruit to a minimum, and if possible only prune in early spring, nevertheless regular pruning is quite important with peaches. The main objective is to remove older wood and leave younger shoots - this is because peaches (and nectarines) fruit primarily on 1-year shoots (i.e. the shoots which grew the previous summer).

If your peach tree sets a good crop in the spring then it is important to thin the fruitlets, otherwise you will end up with lots of small peaches with little flavour. Be ruthless with the thinning because the flavor of home-grown peaches eaten straight from the tree is worth a bit of work!